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2021 A Year in Review

Posted 1/12/2022

Welcome friends.  

Join us around the metaphorical campfire and let’s reflect on FWACC’s 2021 as a community.  

First, thank you. Thank you for providing the support we needed to continue to help the people and animals of Northeast Indiana.  foster1

We are so grateful to be part of a truly caring community.  

It’s easy to become wrapped up in the negative. We share stories of neglected or abused animals and they’re sad and unthinkable every single time. It never gets easier to see these beautiful animals who have suffered so much at the hands of humans. We can focus on the good. In each case someone cared enough to report the animal and every time we share their story donations come in and we have the tools to continue saving lives. 

We had some amazing wins in 2021 and we pushed through some really hard struggles. 

In February, we were so excited when we officially became Orphan Kitten Club partners. This is a charity run by The Kitten Lady whose mission is to give every kitten a chance at a full and happy life. This generous charity gave us a $10,000 grant to care for kittens and a $1500 individual kitten grant to save a little kitten in need named Cece. Best Friends Animal Society also generously gave $25,000 to our foster program which saw another record-breaking year in 2021. Through this program we were able to save 1,551 of the most vulnerable animals who came through our doors.  

This would not be possible without foster homes. When we let you know what we need, you step up. We told you our foster homes were full and we needed help. You stepped up and over 150 new families opened their homes up for an animal in need. This incredible lifesaving increase came with an incredible workload for our foster coordinator. We were lucky to add a contracted foster assistant position thanks to a donation from a generous older couple in Allen County.  

This increase in our foster program led to a need for increased adoptions and we have had yet another record-breaking year in our adoption program with 3,219 new pets finding their forever homes in 2021. 

We completed the No Place Like Home Challenge in March which encouraged citizens of Fort Wayne to be proactive pet companions and make sure pets were microchipped, information was up to date, and they were familiar with what to do when a pet goes missing. This contributed to an extraordinary Return to Home rate of 59% for dogs and 8% for cats. This may seem low but is significantly higher than national averages at 17% for dogs and 2.5% for cats according to national database Shelter Animals Count. 

We are struggling with staffing (like everyone else) and have had to make some adjustments. At one point, 1/3 of our animal control officer were positions open. Even so, our animal control officers responded to 19,123 calls for service. Of those 1,822 were calls of suspected animal cruelty and neglect. Our animal care staff struggled as well. We are so thankful for the help of our community and the 291 volunteers who gave over 11,000 hours of their time in 2021 to helped to ensure the animals’ needs were met.  

In a continued effort to build a kinder, more humane community full of animal advocates, the shelter’s humane education team expanded their educational programs for children. Instead of two weeks of summer camp, six weeks are now offered, in addition to the creation of one-day fall, winter, and spring break camps. 

We hope to make 2022 our best year yet! 

 

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Lucky's Story

Posted 1/21/2022

A small black kitten was found under the hood of a woman’s car after she drove it from the parking lot at her place of work back to her house. It is often common for stray cats to find warmth under cars or even in them. This kitten was terrified and showed all signs of being feral – meaning it wasn’t used to being around humans.

A nice couple brought the kitten to us and asked to foster her after her stray hold period was up. We’re going to be honest. We weren’t sure if this kitten would be okay living in a home around humans due to its behavior towards staff – hissing, spitting, swatting, cowering, etc. As a public safety agency, we must make decisions with both the animal’s and caretaker’s safety in mind.  

The people who found and brought the kitten to us were adamant that they wanted to take this kitten in and help it acclimate to humans. This couple who has adopted from us before and has 4 cats of their own truly wanted to help this kitten, so we allowed them to pick her up and we have an amazing and inspiring update for you!

This couple decided to adopt the kitten and she is proof that shelter life can just be too much for some animals, understandably.

They named her Lucky and here is how she is doing:

Update from 11/19/21

“Just wanted to send you guys an update that Lucky (the cat) is happy, healthy, and totally socialized with humans! We will start introducing her to our other cats when she gets over her sneezing. She was super cuddly the first night we had her. Once again, thank you so much for giving us the chance to save this kitty! We appreciate what you all did for her (spay and chip).”

Update from 1/14/22

“Lucky is doing great! Super happy and cuddly. Gets along very well with my wife and I and the other 4 cats. She even gets along well with our free roam rabbit!

My wife and I thought it might be nice if we shared how we got Lucky to be so friendly so quickly in the event that someone else comes to you guys with a "feral" cat. Maybe sharing these tips won't help everyone but maybe some people! Especially with kittens.

First we put her in a playpen that we have with a litter box, water, and a blanket in a spare room. We did this so she couldn't hide but was still in a controlled environment. We left her alone all day until night time so she could explore her new space without any distractions. We did not leave any food because we wanted that to come from a human hand. This way human interaction becomes a good thing.

At night my wife went in the room and played a cat purring YouTube video close to her body while lying down next to the playpen. She waited there without saying a word and finally Lucky came to check out the purring noise. After that all was good.

Time depends on the kitten but this time it was quick (thankfully). Hope this helps somebody!”

We are so happy Lucky is thriving in her forever home and gets along so well with all the other animals too. How precious are these photos? Thank you so much to the wonderful couple who took a chance on Lucky and are giving her an amazing, loving life.

Lucky for blog

It is important to keep in mind that not all feral cats can be socialized with humans especially if they are adults. Some cats did grow up outside, not interacting with humans and are happy living on their own. Of course it would be ideal if all cats had warm homes to live in and were happy to be around people, but that is just not the case with our cat overpopulation problem. Thankfully in Lucky’s case, she was young enough to be socialized.